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have seen the wall at the base. >> the big steel beams with the fence. this is an effective way of preventing the rock that does fall from causing damage. that might protect the bottom of the hill but it doesn't do anything over the hill. >> it has long been my understanding that the city of san francisco says and the building department takes this position that there is no one buildable lot -- unbuildable lot. i wonder if this is realistic. >> if money is an issue, we can develop solutions that will mitigate the impact. that a solution can be eliminating the hill, that can eliminate the problem. or build a structure right into the hill so there is no longer an exposed face or bold enough of iraq together so that it acts as a big buttress to prevent further movement. -- or hold enough of the rock together so that it acts as a big buttress. we are allowing the wall of the building to act as a retaining structure. there was a time when we did not get any. there was an epic one before in 1982. we brought with us and rainfall charge. >> you were saying that this is somehow correlate
the primary locations of the race themselves, this is not the race course. it is not one big large loop. the race course will be a series of turns and different directions within this blue bubble here in effect. with that as the race course, we have a number of different locations as places for people to attend as spectator venues and programmed as america's cup speck tailor venues. i'm go through some of what that looks like. and peers 30, 32 would be the team bases and piers 26 and 28 are other supporting uses for the event authority and the media and team partners. pier 19 and 23 would be the same thing. and piers 27 and 29 are the america's cup and to see them lead and would be the start-finish line. since a number of the port locations will be under construction, the focus of the 2012 event are the waterfront. so i will walk through this in a moment. first is marina green and the pre-and post-race announcement and where the boats come in and there will be hospitality functions and there is also space for media operations and per the e.i.r. we are focussing on the most conservative
have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has helped us as we had too high air pollution in brussels as it was sanctioned by the european union that we really could stress on alternative mobility. we don't wait until european legislation or regulation coming up. we also have no brussels, no belgium, but european towns, towns in europe, trying to find one another and to press, to put pressure on mayors and regional ministers to commit themselves to invest in
had an attendant that would take a passenger's request and then operate the car. the big change was the emergence of a electric elevators. starting in 1880, the electric elevator allowed building dollars to go much higher. we evolved from steam hydraulic elevators to the electric elevators that are not that much different from what we are going to see now at the top of the tower. this is the steam room on the top of the state st. francis. -- on top of the state francis. the equipment you see painted green, that is all the original equipment from 1972. we are just now in the middle of modernizing this equipment. >> why modernize? doesn't the equipment works fine? >> it does, it is of analog and intensive, and there are some additional controls. let me introduce the foreman to you. this is vince. he can do a better job explaining the project details. >> what is happening here, what are you doing? >> we are doing a major modernization. we are tearing out the old system, logic controls, and generator controls, and we will be going over to solid state. this is not your standard selec
write novels about the types of cases that lawyers like tony handle. in the daytime i work for a big law firm of the type that tony probably would not hold in the highest of esteem, but i'm delighted to be here. you know, i think if you talked to most authors, they will tell you that there is something hot-wired into our system that says we need to try to tell a story. there is nothing at all in my background. i am an absolutely accidental writer. there is nothing in my background which suggests i should be writing novels. i grew up in chicago. i write books about san francisco. i studied accounting at the university of illinois. i have been a corporate and securities attorney for 28 years. i've now written seven best-selling novels about murder trials, death penalty cases, and courtroom drama. i have never handled a criminal case in my life. [laughing] so all of you out there who are thinking of writing novels, there is hope. but i did have this feeling a long time ago, probably from the time i was in high school, that at some point i would like to try to write a novel. and i can't expl
one of the few youth commissions. they work on the variety of youth issues. the ymc has launched big brothers and big sisters. nick cannon has an entire campaign of stop hating. kind of embedded in citiess and communities around california. in terms of digital media, i think that's a very important part. we have a lot of digital lead companies. you have new america media. youth outlook. you've not bay cat and bay vac. each of those are engaged with probationers. so i think that people recognize the value of digital media. we have to connect and explore those job opportunities directing our young people. we are doing that. we are around in digital media work. >> i meant to say bay cat. it's actually a digital media company. we work with the crn and currently trying to pull things together with bay cat. it's a good place in terms of getting our youth in that. >> i would like to engage the private sector to push the limits on the use of technology to keep in touch with our kids. i would love to put a cell phone in the hands of everybody in the probation. and that we would have the kid
, cancer, all of that stuff. america's cup will bring huge revenues. a sole focus on getting the big money in. incidentally, i know a little bit about developing space. as far as recreation and the park, we don't have an off land to develop playgrounds. what we do have is a terminal that has four football fields long of park areas that will have sufficient exercise, playgrounds, and all of that stuff. we don't have an of available plans to develop that. focus on what is needed. let's get the proper development. let's bring in businesses like that. there is the beautification of it. it lets keep the waterfront beautiful. it brings in of a lot of money from events. this report has all the right things. please listen to the people. it they live here and work here. they know what is best. thank you. president olague: [reading names] everyeone elone else i called b. >> my name is nancy shanahan. the luxury condo project that requires the inclusion of a publicly owned a lot held in public trust for the people of california is not what comprehensive planning is about. but that is what the plannin
a big part from public transport. what was the conclusion of all the businesses? if we go on like this, we have a real big problem in one, two years, maybe a little bit longer, we will not have any mobility anymore in our own region. that was one of the reasons that businesses came together and they were thinking, what can we do, not for a long time because it takes time, but what can we do today that helps today? that is important for the accessibility, and accessibility is very important for good, competition against the other regions in europe. of course, it is very important for the quality of life. if we want to attract international business, we need to attract people from outside. they only come if it is nice to live in your city. k4they were trying to reduce te parking, which was 10%. we went into negotiation with the employers' organizations and with employers, telling them that it is not only a problem of the public, but also a problem of their own companies. it worked. after half a year of talking, 17 companies directly signed the agreement, also some americans among them.
, i'm sure his heart is as big as mine in terms of what this means to the residents of san francisco, so i want to introduce the mayor to everyone. [applause] >> thank you very much. i want to also continue the very important attribute that we have for eloise westbrook. when i was just a young workers never trying to cause trouble in the city on behalf of low-income residents, i have already heard of ms. westbrook. she was already helping lead the effort to improve housing conditions for all of our public housing tenants. my today, it is just really appropriate to make sure that our city honors mr. westbrook, her family, who is here today, i know. thank you very much for being here. this is very appropriate that this new project be in the name and westbrook loss of the another great place for people to understand and know about the history of the city. i am so happy to be part of this great city when it names and after people in the community who have done great work. i recognize that, and i know doris, our supervisor, was there as well. she recognizes that. thank you very much for b
to focus on is access to these buildings so we don't get a big dislocation and undercut the economic reason for why we want to do this. going forward we have a lot of coordination and with those kinds of things and how to get the word out and the small businesses and how to put your best foot forward. and i will say due to some of the stacking of what needs to be done, that isn't really fully formed yet. but we have a willing partner in the event authority and we really take to heart, for example, the economic impact study done before the america's cup came with this really great big number on it. you have to do something to make that happen. i think we really see this not just as the america's cup coming but how to ramp up for that and also to create a legacy for the businesses to put their best foot forward and do the work for these teams and visitors and going forward on a more permanent basis. that is the focus we're taking and will want to build that out and put the full picture in front of people and looking at the e.i.r. approval and saying is this something we, the city, wants to mo
youth-oriented. i think you could have a big input to make sure that what we are doing will be there for you to raise families as well. i want to congratulate all the nominees tonight. all of you who have been participating in this competition for the fellowship have been doing great work. i have been reading through some of the accomplishments that you are a part of. i got to meet some of you, luckily, last month when you participated in youth advocacy day, but you also followed up -- some of you were at the old school cafe with what house representatives about what the youths were looking at in terms of their future, participation in the city. here in city hall, we are serious about having programs that not only help you out, but to make sure you get the support you need to be successful. we want you and need you to be successful. without that, we are literally a soulless city. whether it is being able to traverse on a good muni system, having a good education system, or being able to work in a company like twitter. i am working with two great supervisors and we are w
, the direction they want to go. that is why this decision was so appropriate. >> the other big shock is that the moderates seem to have won this round. people thought, progressives have themselves on the board. there is no reason that they will not get together and take a noted leader who is a progressive to be interim mayor, and then stayed there for another term. the great thing about being in term mayor is to get to run as an incumbent. the fact that the progressives could not get together to get somebody into office as interim mayor in their own self-interest was very surprising for a lot of us. >> what happened in the last month in city hall was an incredible show of democracy that was part policy, part politics, and it all came together, and more than anything -- not just from a reporter's perspective, often was this? but there was a public interest as well on what was going on in san francisco government. we take it for granted a law that there is a city government here. this was something that brought people together. you heard people talking about it at the cafes, park playg
. >> okay. all right. peer pressure. >> my name is rudy corpus. give a big shout out. i think one good solution is to focus more on elementary school kids. educate them in a way they can comprehend. if they can recite a whole e-40. you know a first grader came to school with a gun. focus on the elementary school kids. that's a solution. thank you. and rudy corp >> i have 15 job openings for kids in foster homes. we currently serve 120 kids. we have the seneca center where we are building a family resource center so the parents who go to san francisco unified school district can come get food, clothing and all of those. please, i have information on the back. take some, hand it out. call me. >> okay. now we're going to have to break for lunch. we do have lunch that we provided right outside. we have delicious sandwiches. this is an opportunity for us to talk. once again. please fill out your form. if you have ideas. these will be incorporated by larry roberts. we are going to come back. we have youth performances. be back here. we are going to celebrate john osaki. >> thank you so >>
by, you know, some big cultural institution to make their work. and it does-- it makes it possible for a lot of people who wouldn't have access to art-making to have access to it. we want to talk some more about the battle itself and the path through the courts, but if you answer this question-- why in the world does it make sense for somebody who's working in rockford, illinois, to have some money taken from his paycheck to fund your work? why not keep government out of the arts? well, one of the things is-- this is one of the arguments that people would often say: "you know, if the majority of people in this country "didn't like your work, why should they have to pay for it?" well, of course, the majority of people haven't seen my work. but this really goes to the question-- a couple of key questions about what is the role of minorities and minority expression in a majority-rule system that we supposedly have? does this mean that minorities have no rights? you know, and do we have no access to speaking? and it also goes to the question-- i think this whole arts question is about
partners. this is a big thank you to microsoft for investing in our kids. before i start, i want to work knowledge a couple of people. our director of san francisco education and a wonderful partner. kimberly is here with her team. marie from the school district, and laurie, who heads our bridge to success program. these are folks that are making all of this happened. thank you for being here. i would like to welcome our host and chancellor from city college to welcome you and opened this up, dr. don griffin. [applause] >> thank you for being here today. i hope you are excited about mission campus. this is one of our finest campuses, but do not be fooled -- we have nine others, most of which are larger than this. we are very excited about you being here. one, i think you made a commitment to go to college, and college has made a commitment to you. we are trying to, this summer for the summer bridge, make college real for you. in other words, so there is no getting lost or confused about how to get financial aid, counseling, and all those things. this program here is for the students. we
and representing him. >> i have represented him since 1966. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved.
in the big gallery. >> i noticed a lot of artists doing really site-specific work. >> this is a pile of balloons, something that is so familiar, like a child's balloon. in this proportion, suddenly, it becomes something out of a dream. >> or a nightmare. >> may be a nightmare. >> this one over here is even harder to figure out what the initial material is. >> this is made out of puffy paint. often, kids use it to decorate their clothes. she has made all these lines of paint. >> for the pieces we are looking at, is there a core of foam or something in the middle of these pieces that she built on top of? >> i'm not telling. >> ah, a secret. >> this silver is aluminum foil, crumbled of aluminum foil. her aesthetic is very much that quiet, japanese spatial thing that i really admire. their attention to the materiality of the things of the world. >> this is a nice juxtaposition you have going on right now. you have a more established artists alongside and emerging artists. is that something important to you as well? >> very important in this space, to have artists who really have not show
. they will renovate the trails around the lake. and the big project is the capital project for pine lake meadow. they are going to returf the dog run and the meadow by the day camp. we are looking for a very busy fall. by the spring of next year should have major renovations to the mark thal make it an outstanding park. i don't ever refer to it as my park. all the parks belong to all the people. this park belongs just as much to the families in the bay view sdrishth as it does to the gentlemen that lives across the street. i'm happy and proud to be the caretaker for them. i wake up every day and thank that i havee >> the san francisco cons tri of flowers in golden gate park is now showing a new exhibit that changes the way we see the plants around us. amy stewart's best-selling book, "wicked plants" is the inspiration behind the new exhibit that takes us to the dark side of the plant world. >> i am amy stewart. i am the arthur of "wicked plants," the weeds that killed lincoln's mother and other botanical atrocities. with the screens fly trap, that is kind of where everybody went initially, you
that kind of service could make a big difference is truancy and students having to get on muni doesn't benefit them. i am not here to indict muni, it's not the best ride to school every day. >> in terms of a public school bus system. i think the taxpayers, they invest a great deal into muni. i would say as someone who in new york as an elementary student and middler schooler. i was afforded to use the public transportation, i didn't go to and from home. i used it to be to baseball. we are blessed in terms of the expansiveness. you can travel to every corner of this city at any time of the day. a school bus system going into my time when i was in atlanta. most of the students if not all rode to school buss, that was additional cost. it was additional cost to them and the students were literally limited to and from their home and to school and in some cases may be if there was sporting events. there's pluses and minuses. right for the beginning there's a cost factor. >> due to time. as i stated from the beginning. if you have questions, please write them down. we will collect them. jef
courage in bay area courts, and we do ok in the big battles as well. who will ever forget the extraordinary accomplishments of john in defending our college, patrick, from a crazy federal prosecutor in nevada? that level of talent and that level of courage is unique, but every day criminal courts in the bay area shine because my colleagues from ctla are working there. recently ctla issued a public statement against the death penalty. ctla joins other groups and individuals here today in calling for permanent incarceration as california's alternative to the death penalty. this city and county has a great san francisco public defender and we want to express our thanks to jeff adachi for his support of ctla over the years and for his gratitude for being here today. thank you for your taxi and have a great conference -- thank you for your attention and have a great conference. [applause] >> i also want to acknowledge the public defender, past-present president of the california lawyers association. thank you for being here. now, we have our 50th anniversary tribute to "to kill
agreement, with the cooperation with other public agencies to plan for what is coming. this is a big effort to make certain that everything comes off without a hitch. we will look into the implementation plans being developed with a different subject areas, and do a quick overview of the upcoming milestones with aspects of the project description coming out along with the environmental impact report. so first, we will start with the venue agreement, which was signed on december 21 of 2010, with san francisco as the host city. the parties to the event of the america's cup authority, who are called the project sponsor. they have all the offshore activities. the sister agency is in charge of the portion of the water. and when you look at these sorts of -- putting on the competitive events, managing the water space. there are three pillars of the city's obligations to bring this to life. the first of them as environmental california quality, getting approval for this after this was completed earlier this year. there are also plans required to be completed, with different approaches to the subje
. that coalition building. i was flying back. i did a key-note. going to nasa, you have 3 big panoramas behind me. my people. i will end with this, ladies and gentlemen. i got on the airplane. i was tired. i got in and i was on a good airline. i got in the window seat. a gentlemen, an african american. people were getting on the plane and they were bypassing us. they would look and keep going. i knew something was up. they looked at the same chairs. i said, it is what it is. until a young boy came. and he sat between us. that gave me an awful lot of hope. it took him to teach us. children have a renewed effect on us. finally to conclude. i had a great complement. most teachers who are here with respect. you are the reason we are here. you give us hope. this complement, he said, doctor revelez. you are pretty cool. nice, huh. but then he said. do you want me to hook you up with my mom. doctor adachi, thank you very much. >> all right. my name is is an swan right. according to a 2001 survey. 84 percent said they were satisfied with high school safety. 22 percent said they were not. >> my name is ma
as their customers. and that is a big change, because before they were the enemy. >> the situation in the netherlands is completely different. cyclists are not encouraged to take their bikes on public transport. it is especially forbidden to have normal bikes and rush hour. the reason is because of 4% of the clients of public transport of trains, by bike. what they provide for our enough bicycle parking and the possibility to take a bite from the station to where you want to go -- and the possibility to take a bicycle from the station to where you want to go to with a public transport bicycle. they say, we do not want to take the bike on the train, only for recreational purposes. on sunday, it is quite easy to take your bike. outside, it is only folding box and a provide enough bike parking. >> the public transport bicycle at the end of the trip, it is that a bike share program? is that a transit program? >> it is a bicycle sharing program. the bikes are not free. the cost 2.85 euros per day to use it. but it is growing very popular. >> on the issue of bikes and transit, in the u.s., a traditionally
this was a big conspiracy to frame this man. what i learned is -- and i discussed this with geronimo -- we are experiencing men and women who thought the end justified the means. they thought they had a bad man and it was ok to do anything necessary to convict him. as i look back on my career, present and future, i think we see that that is the concept that runs through police misconduct. i am sure there are officers who were just bad, let's say. i think officers see what they consider bad people, and they feel like they have to do what ever it takes to convict them. and i have seen it when i was a young lawyer, when we had narcotics teams, we would get clients to said they arrested me with $20,000 and they said i only had $10,000. and we knew there were telling the truth. it i have seen it with law- enforcement officers in the case where a rogue cop shot a young girl, and the four other officers were all good men. remember -- you talk about misconduct, but primarily -- i want to get back to this -- most law enforcement people i have grown to know in my career are good and i think want to
the big work itself. the ultimate thing is that us coming together is really going to show the difference with the youth we're working. we are able to get the guns off the street. they will be back. not by the choice the youth. >> i would also like to say, mayor newsom has tried to take the approach to enact legislation to out law gun shows. minimize the availability of folks to purchase now firemans. we are limited by state and federal law. when we look at what we can do as a city, we are bound by the state and federal law. we have taken creative approaches and eliminate the accessiblity of fireman it is. we have more work to do >> i think one of the most damaging lines. one youth told us. he is more scared of getting caught without a gun on the street than caught with a gun by the police. it's a direct and general order, we will accept any gun. no questions asked. it's booked as found property. you know brothers and sisters and people who have guns. make the call. we have hot lines. we have to get them off the street. we talk about these injunctions. i often wonder what's going to happe
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25